Demorest

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Demorest

Demorestfactory1.jpg

Williamsport, PA

Earlier shuttle machines were supplied by or had links to several different companies including New York (linked with) Williams, June and Eldredge (see National Sewing Machine Company).

In 1894 and 1895 Demorest machines were advertised at $19.50, warranted for five years, with 100,000 having been sold in ten years. The address given was 155 West 23rd Street, New York.


1900: E R Payne, President; Hugh MacDonald, Manager. They also manufactured bicycles and light castings of all descriptions were a specialty. This included opera chairs.


Hugh MacDonald/McDonald worked for Williams at the Plattsburgh, NY plant in 1882/3 when he patented an improved face plate/needle bar/take up design and treadle casters.








Demorest

Mme Demorest Running Stitch Machine

This is Aaron Palmer's May 13, 1862 patent for a running stitch machine. It came to be sold under names such as Mme. Demorest, Gold Medal, Fairy and Little Gem.

This kind of running stitch sold for between $5 - $10. The needle is fixed into position and the fabric is fed onto the needle by means of a rising and falling bar which carries the cloth alternately above and below the point of the needle. Also sold under the names of Gold Medal, Fairy and Little Gem.


An advert from 1863 describes the machine as follows:

A Gem for the Million and a Splendid and Appropriate Holiday Present: Mme Demorest's Running Stitch $5 Sewing Machine.

The embodiment of practical utility, and a marvel of simplicity; makes the running stitch very rapidly and perfect, uses a common needle, and will last a lifetime. At the New York State Fair, its simplicity, efficiency, and a great practical utility, was confirmed by the award of the First Premium.

It will gather, ruffle, shirr, tuck, run up breadths, etc., with a single or double thread on any material adapted to the running stitch. The thinnest, usually the most difficult to stitch by other sewing machines, being sewed the easiest. For ladies' and children's apparel, and other articles made of light fabrics, it will therefore be found almost invaluable.

It is attached to the table like a sewing bird, and having no tension, and requiring no lubrication or change of stitch, is always ready for operation, and such a marvel of simplicity that a child of six or eight years can understand and use it successfully.

It is not at all liable to get out of order.

Each machine is put up in a neat box, accompanied with full and explicit directions, and twenty five needles.

Sent to any address in the United States on receipt of an order, inclosing the amount, or may be collected by Express on deliver of the machine.

When the money is sent with the order and registered, we guarantee its safe receipt and the delivery of machine, anywhere within 2000 miles of free any Express charges.

Very liberal arrangement for agencies.

See Mirror of Fashions, or for full particulars, specimen of sewing, etc., send a stamp for return postage. Address, MME. DEMOREST, 473 Broadway, NY


Demorest

Serial #27 19164

Courtesy of Kelly Pakes

The under view confirms the crooked horizontal shuttle lever used by New York machines. The machine has the earlier shaped bed and an angled body. Serial numbers start with 1, 27, and 45.


Courtesy of Jim Pringle

The machine has the earlier shaped bed, but a rounded body to the machine. Bobbin winder is under the logo badge. Demorest cast into the treadle irons in a curve. Serial numbers begin with a 1 or 6.


Topic

Serial #1 94734 (under front slide plate)

Courtesy of Jess

Earlier machines have a more angled body, while this model has a rounded body and also a rectangular bed. Decorated face plate. Underneath the machine, the horizontal shuttle lever is straight, whereas the illustration for the New York model is curved.

Serial number begins with 1.


Serial #1 109155

Courtesy of Kelly Pakes

Rectangular bed and plain D for logo on shoulder. Serial numbers start with a 1, although badged machines have a different series, in the 3xxxxx range, from Kelly Pakes' research.


Serial #1 303007

Courtesy of Rachel

This machine is badged as Journal. The shoulder logo is a sword behind a shield with a star.